Mr Lincoln in the Garden

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A Mr. Lincoln rose. Apparently I’ve decided to turn that side of the house into a rose garden.

It surprised me too. Guess I should look up how to prune the poor things.

  • When I had a house I let my roses grow wild. They did fine and had the added bonus of appalling my mother in law.

  • I love it when one can multitask like that.

  • nightsmusic

    Beautiful rose! The problem with some rose species though if you let them grow wild is, as the plant dies off, it saps the energy needed to get it ready for the next year’s growth and so over the winter, they die.

    If you want to cut the roses, cut them above a five-leaf-group. Just above it. Cut back the brown areas on the stems that start to die back and dead-head them (cut the dying blooms off) at a five-leaf-group. They’ll stay pretty healthy every year that way provided you don’t get black rot.

    I have a climber that’s over 100 years old and this year, lost most of it to the evil winter weather. I cut it back to the ground and it’s started growing again.

    I do find though that when pruning them, I get some of my best ideas. It’s a very calming thing for me.

  • Jeff Isaak

    just make sure to protect them from Aphids or black spot. RoseRX works good for that.

    http://gardening.about.com/od/rose1/a/RosePruning.htm

  • Sounds good. I’ll prune these when they go dormant in the winter, and hope for the best.

  • Thanks! We have a really healthy ladybug population around here, so aphids are manageable.

  • nightsmusic

    I buy ladybugs and praying mantis by the box. Or I used to, at our old house. Here, I have all sorts of good bugs. But I still fight the black rot or black spot. It is the bane of my rose growing existence. At our old house though, I had about 100 rose bushes, mostly heirloom and David Winter roses. A little care and they’ll do fine.

  • Beautiful!
    Our centennial rose bush recently, and quite suddenly, bloomed as well. Every flower on the same day in a matter of hours.
    I’m surprised it survived the winter, and only hope that the lady bugs are as prolific this summer as they were last summer.